This page includes references for three Institute for Health Policy integrated care stories documents including the healthy bones program story, the early warning system for hospitalized patients story, and the women’s hereditary cancer program story.

The Healthy Bones Program

  1. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hip Fractures Among Older Adults, https://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/falls/adulthipfx.html, accessed February 2, 2021.
  2. Dane Hansen, FSA, MAAA, Carol Bazell, MD, MPH, Pamela Pelizzari, MPH, Bruce Pyenson, FSA, MAAA, “Medical Cost of Osteoporotic Fractures,” Milliman Research Report, August 2019.
  3. Gabriel S. Tajeu, et al., “Death, Debility, and Destitution Following Hip Fracture,” The Journals of Gerontology Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, March 2014, p. 346.
  4. Jane E. Brody, “After a Broken Bone, the Risk of a Second Fracture,” The New York Times, November 9, 2020, Section D, p. 7.
  5. Analysis of Integrated Data Repository data for patients age 60 and above, maintained by Kaiser Permanente Insight, provided by Navraj Mudahar, MHA, and Grace Xuan Chen, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, February 2021.

Early Warning System for Hospitalized Patients

  1. Gabriel J. Escobar, MD, et al., “Automated Identification of Adults at Risk for In-Hospital Clinical Deterioration,” The New England Journal of Medicine, November 2020, p. 1951.
  2. Gabriel J. Escobar, MD, et al., “Automated Identification of Adults at Risk for In-Hospital Clinical Deterioration,” The New England Journal of Medicine, November 2020, p. 1951; and Paulson, RN, et al., “What Do We Do After the Pilot Is Done? Implementation of a Hospital Early Warning System at Scale,” The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, April 2020, p. 207.

The Women’s Hereditary Cancer Program

  1. American Cancer Society, Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2019-2020. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2019.
  2. National Cancer Institute, BRCA Gene Mutations: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing, https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet, accessed February 1, 2021.
  3. Stanford Medicine Cancer Institute, Decision Tool for Women with BRCA Mutations, http://brcatool.stanford.edu/brca.html, accessed February 1, 2021.
  4. Andreas Koldehoff, MD, et al., “Cost-Effectiveness of Targeted Genetic Testing for Breast and Ovarian Cancer: A Systematic Review,” Value in Health, February 2021, p. 303, and Elvira D’Andrea, MD, et al., “Which BRCA Genetic Testing Programs Are Ready for Implementation in Health Care? A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations,” Genetics in Medicine, April 2016, p. 1171.